Monday, October 10, 2011

Resource Lists Legal and Financial Issues for People with Alzheimer’s

U.S. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Institute on Aging

Resources > Resource Lists Legal and Financial Issues for People with Alzheimer’s Disease: A Resource List Families face a variety of challenges when a loved one develops Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or a related disorder, including coping with legal and financial issues.

This resource list provides an overview of helpful brochures, handbooks, tool kits, and other materials to help people with AD and their caregivers make appropriate decisions. The AD Lib number at the end of each item can be used to search for a full description of the item at, an online database of resources on the ADEAR Center website.

Resources for Low-Income Families Families who cannot afford a lawyer still can do advance planning.

Samples of basic health planning documents can be downloaded from State government websites. Area Agency on Aging officials may provide legal advice or help.

Other possible sources of legal assistance and referral include State legal aid offices, the State bar association, local nonprofit agencies, foundations, and social service agencies.


Facing Alzheimer’s disease can be emotionally wrenching for all concerned. A legal expert and members of the health care team can help the person and family address end-of-life issues. Advance health care and financial planning can help people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and their families confront

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Caregiving at the Crossroads

Caregiving at the Crossroads: Caregiving at the Crossroads

With the convergence of an aging population, advancement in technology and a baby boomer mentality, caregiving is at a crucial crossroad. Sharon K. Brothers, M.S.W. is President & CEO of the Institute for Senior Living Education, home of aQuire Training Solutions, EasyCEU and Caring for Mom(under development) - but more importantly, Sharon is committed to exploring solutions to caregiving challenges using the best technology and human skills have to offer.

CAREGIVING_Roadmap from

CAREGIVING_Roadmap_021010.pdf (application/pdf Object)

CAREGIVING_Roadmap_021010.pdf (application/pdf Object)

CAREGIVING_Roadmap_021010.pdf (application/pdf Object)

Talking microwave for Seniors. Aging in Place.

Eating & Cooking - LeVaunt. Products for Seniors. Aging in Place.: Talking Microwave The Talking Microwave Oven is a voice output microwave oven designed for use by individuals who are blind or have low vision. In addition to a talking control panel, this microwave has a notched knob to set cooking times. Speech output can be in either English or Spanish. Features include preset functions for common foods, clock, timer, turntable and express cook one-touch buttons.

Cooking Under Pressure: Arming seniors and family caregivers with nutrition resources for healthy aging | Caregiver Stress

Cooking Under Pressure: Arming seniors and family caregivers with nutrition resources for healthy aging | Caregiver Stress: Cooking Under Pressuresm Program

The importance of nutrition to healthy aging is why Home Instead Senior Care has launched the Cooking Under Pressure nutrition campaign. This program provides education and support to seniors and their family members who are sometimes stressed-out by the demands of caregiving.

Partnering with nutrition experts at the University of Maryland and Duke Diet and Fitness Center (part of Duke University Medical Center), the company has developed a handbook of nutrition tips as well as healthy and interesting recipes that can spice it up for most any senior. The program will assist family caregivers who want to get organized by providing shopping tips and 12 food staples that older adults shouldn't live without.

Meal Plans for Caregivers |

Meal Plans for Caregivers | Meal Plans for Caregivers
By Laurie Dickinson, eHow Contributor

Planning meals alleviates stress for caregivers.

A little planning goes a long way, especially when taking care of others. Not only does planning help to organize and manage daily duties and activities more efficiently, but it also allows the caregiver more time for herself. Planning simple, nutritious meals helps relieve some of the stresses of the caregiver's job

Cook for Your Caree

How Can We Help You Cook for Your Caree? - How Can We Help You Cook for Your Caree?
Posted by cooking4care on Feb 21st, 2011 in Cooking for Caregiving | 15 comments

(Editor’s Note: Today, we welcome a new blog, Cooking for Caregiving, penned by John Reaves and Liz Dreyer of Care Lab. Care Lab works to develop new ideas, products, services, partnerships, and sustainable programs that will make a difference to the community of caregivers..)

We’ve begun a project we call “Cooking for Caregiving” focusing on issues related to (you guessed it!) grocery shopping, preparing, delivering and serving meals for your caree.

There are a lot of reasons why we think this is an important issue. Obviously, it’s a big part of the challenge of caregiving for many caregivers. The excellent 2009 MetLife study estimated that 75% of caregivers helped with food shopping, and 64% with meal preparation. And research is increasingly demonstrating that nutrition is an important risk factor for many chronic conditions, as well as having a critical impact on the health and well-being of all seniors.

The Healthy Guide to Caregiver Cooking | Philadelphia Home Care

The Healthy Guide to Caregiver Cooking | Philadelphia Home Care: Our Home Care Guide to Caregiver Cooking

Meal preparation and cooking is often included in the repertoire of services that are offered by traditional home care services. There are many tips and tricks that the caregiver can use to simplify this process while ensuring the safety of the client at the same time.

The home care agency should be aware of any dietary restrictions that are prescribed to the patient and pass this information on to the caregiver to help when planning and preparing meals for their client. For diabetic seniors, it isn’t only sugar that poses a dietary threat, but starchy foods that eventually turn into sugar as well. For seniors who are on a low-sodium restricted diet, the caregiver should be mindful of the hidden sodium content in some of the foods. There are many recipes that can be tailored to meet certain restrictions and many recipes that have been created for the sole purpose of being compatible with dietary restrictions. Perhaps the client’s doctor has already given them menu suggestions to follow that can be incorporated into the meal preparation.

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Hearing Loss Web

hearing loss events, issues, medical topics, resources, and technology
Hearing Loss Web

Hearing Loss Web is dedicated to people who have hearing loss, but are not members of the traditional Deaf community. This includes people who consider themselves to be hearing impaired, hard of hearing, late deafened, and oral deaf. We provide information on events, issues, medical topics, resources, and technology related to hearing loss.